(480) 727-9425 Stephen.Pratt@asu.edu

People

Stephen Pratt

Stephen Pratt

Principal Investigator

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Postdoctoral Researchers

Gabriele Valentini

Gabriele Valentini

Postdoc

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Ant colonies are marvelous computing entities, able to gather information from their environment and process it collectively. The focus of my research is to study emerging computation during collective decision-making by ant colonies. I use nest-site selection by Temnothorax rugatulus as case study and look at the flow of information during colony emigrations. Building on the framework of information theory, I am looking at answering questions such as where and when colonies store information, how information flows within the colony, and how much the information within the colony is integrated.

Nobuaki Mizumoto

Nobuaki Mizumoto

Postdoc

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Animal behaviors form various macro-scale patterns such as structures, movement patterns, and rhythms. How are these patterns created by behavioral rules and shaped by evolution? I am looking for answers to these questions by observing various behaviors of termites. These include the mate search behavior of individual termite reproductives, as well as complex colony behaviors that are coordinated by thousands of individuals. My current focus is on the evolutionary process of collective building. I am seeking a framework which can explain the nest building mechanisms of all termite species.

Daniel Charbonneau

Daniel Charbonneau

Postdoc

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My research aims to understand how groups function, and often excel, because of and in spite of the individuals that compose them. I am interested in how work is allocated in decentralized complex systems, particularly in the role of ‘task-less’ workers (‘inactive’ and ‘interactive’ workers) in task allocation. I am also interested in how colonies adjust workers to workload in dynamic environments, as well as cases where colonies seem inflexible, even to their detriment. My current work looks at the role of individual behavior in collective strategies for attack and defense. 

Zachary Shaffer

Zachary Shaffer

Faculty Associate

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Temnothorax rugatulus, like many ant species, has an inordinate fondness for sugar water! As a graduate student in the Pratt lab, my work capitalized on this love for carbohydrates as I examined the social foraging of colonies: the collective consequences to their mode of communication (tandem runs), and the ways that colonies focus exploitation on the most rewarding food sources. Ant social foraging can be viewed as just one aspect of colony homeostasis – where the behavior of individuals furthers the collective needs of the group. As far as complex systems go, ant societies make for wonderful teachers!


Graduate Students

John Yohan Cho

John Yohan Cho

PhD Student

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Social animals often share information with one another about resources such as food or shelter. I am interested in information sharing during recruitment in ants. I ask questions like: what kind of information is shared between ants? Does transfer of information differ when the quality of target is different? To answer these questions, I use experiments to disentangle different possibilities, and collaborate with engineers to develop novel tools. For example, we use a robot with an ant dummy to lead other ants on preset paths, to test what information the followers gather from following the dummy.

Jon Jackson

Jon Jackson

PhD Student

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I study collective decision making in honeybees. I began by studying how honeybees regulate the construction of different types of comb, but have since shifted my interests into studying how honeybees guard against other honeybees. Current theory suggests that how accepting guards bees are of incoming bees should be condition dependent. Better understanding the nature of these conditions is the current focus of my research.

Andrew Burchill

Andrew Burchill

PhD Student

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Imagine that you are going to throw a potluck dinner. Each guest can bring one ingredient, and they cannot discuss plans ahead of time. How do you stop everyone from bringing hamburger buns and no one bringing any patties? This is the problem ant colonies face: only a few foragers go “grocery shopping” for the entire colony, yet they coordinate their behavior without any leader.  I am working to uncover the behavioral mechanisms behind this process. Along with my co-advisor Ted Pavlic, I am straddling the divide between engineering and biology, using principles and examples from each to inform and enrich the other.


Undergraduate Students

Cassius Cunningham

Cassius Cunningham

Undergraduate

Isaiah Sampson

Isaiah Sampson

Undergraduate

Byounghoon Kang

Byounghoon Kang

Undergraduate

Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams

Undergraduate

Samantha Castro

Samantha Castro

Undergraduate

Moira McCarthy

Moira McCarthy

Undergraduate


Lab alumni

Peter Marting

Postdoctoral Scientist in Communications and Entomology, Parque das Aves, Cataracts do Iguaçu, Brazil

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Ted Pavlic

Assistant Professor, School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering and School of Sustainability, Arizona State University

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Aurélie Buffin

Adjunct Faculty, Mesa Community College

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Takao Sasaki

Assistant Professor, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia

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